Guide to Your Contact Lens Problems and Issues

As with anything else you use on a regular basis, you are likely to encounter some sort of issue with your contact lenses, so it’s important to both anticipate problems which may arise, and understand how to deal with them.

Guide to Your Contact Lens Problems and Issues in Olympia

Contact Lens Problems

As with most things, contact lenses can, at times, lead to problems. Since contact lenses are a medical device, it is extra important that any problems that arise are identified and dealt with quickly.

 

While contact lenses avoid some of the problems commonly had with eyeglasses, there are other potential issues one should be aware of so they can be avoided.

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What Problems Should I Be Aware Of?

Reduced Vision Quality

If your reusable lenses aren’t cleaned properly, buildup on the lenses can reduce your vision quality and, in extreme cases, lead to the lenses getting stuck in your eye. You wouldn’t want to introduce foreign particles from the air into your eyes; don’t do just that by not cleaning your contacts!

Eye Infections 

If your contact lenses are not maintained properly and not sterile, bacteria or other dangerous particles can get into your eye and lead to infections that can cause scarring and vision loss. 

In the case of infection, see your eye doctor to receive proper treatment as quickly as possible.

Hypoxia 

As with the rest of your body, your eyes, the corneas in particular, require oxygen, and the corneas get this oxygen directly from the air. However, since your contact lenses sit right atop the cornea, it may block it from getting the oxygen it needs. This can lead to swelling and cloudy vision. This problem is far more likely with extended use contacts or with people who sleep with their contact lenses on. If this is an issue for you, your eye doctor will likely recommend you change to using lenses that allow more oxygen in. You may also receive a steroid to put in your eyes to ease swelling and prevent things from getting any worse.

Conjunctivitis (Pinkeye) 

There are several different types of pinkeye, which causes swelling and redness on your eyelid, but the type you are most likely to get with contacts is called papillary conjunctivitis. This is more of an allergic reaction, with your body seeing the contact lens as a foreign object and attempting to fight it.

 

If symptoms are mild, it will likely go away on its own and not require treatment. In more severe cases, however, your doctor may prescribe a topical steroid of anti-inflammatory to treat the symptoms and you may have to refrain from wearing your lenses for a while. If this is a persistent issue, your doctor may recommend you wear a different type of lens (made of different material), daily disposable lenses, or a different lens solution.

Dry Eye

Dry eye occurs when your eyes don’t produce enough tears to keep them moist. Dry eye can increase the likelihood of infection, and it makes it tougher to get dust out of your eyes, leading to irritation. Wearing contact lenses for extended periods can exacerbate this issue.

 

Artificial tears can be a remedy, but you must be careful that the one you use doesn’t have preservatives, as that can further irritate your eyes. Also check to make sure they are safe to use while your contact lenses are in. If the eye drops you use are not working, consult with your eye doctor to receive other recommendations.

Scratched Cornea

There are a few possible ways to scratch your cornea while wearing contacts. Your finger might accidentally do so while taking the contacts out, and the lens itself might cause a scratch (especially if they are not properly cleaned and dirt builds up on them).

 

If your eye hurts or it feels like there’s something in it, and it is red and tearing up, take the contact lens out and see your doctor immediately. Generally, a scratched cornea will heal on its own in a day or two, but if it’s not properly treated your eye could become infected. If a scratch doesn’t heal quickly, contact your eye doctor for additional guidance and treatment.

Allergic Reactions:

You can have an allergic reaction to either the material your contact lenses are made of, or the cleaning solution (the latter is more common). If this is the reason for your discomfort, you will need to try another solution or contact lenses made out of a different material.

Multifocal Contact Lenses

Multifocal contacts, which have distinct viewing areas of different powers, are extremely useful for those who require correction for both near and far vision, but they can be difficult to adapt to for some. Additionally, you may experience uncomfortable glare during the darker hours of the day. It can take between four and six weeks to adapt. If it takes longer than that, you can consult your doctor on what your best options are.

How to Avoid Contact Lens Problems

The simple answer is to make sure you get the right lenses. Make sure they are the right fit, and ask your doctor about the different lens types before making a purchase. However, in some cases you may have to try multiple types of lenses to determine which is right for you.

 

Taking proper care of your lenses will also reduce the likelihood of any problems arising. Be sure to follow the directions of both your doctor and the lens manufacturer regarding the wearing, cleaning, and storage of your lenses. Trying to save a little time and money by skimping on cleaning or by wearing contacts longer than advised can lead to more costly problems in the long run.

How to Avoid Contact Lens Problems

Common Questions

This is determined on a case by case basis. There is no one lens that fits the best on every patient. The curvature of patients’ eyes vary, so some lenses that may fit perfectly on one person can be too tight or too loose on another patient. Also, if someone has a very high astigmatism or an eye condition called keratoconus the best type of contact lens for them would be a hard lens, such as a rigid gas permeable lens or scleral lens, whereas for another patient a daily disposable soft contact lens may be best. Thus, be sure to get a proper contact lens evaluation by your eye doctor to determine what is the best type of contact lens for you specifically.
How do you wear a face mask with glasses? Answer: One of the best ways to wear a mask with glasses to reduce fog and keep the Rx intact depends on the type of mask being worn. Generally, if you can position your glasses just slightly over and past the top of the mask you'll be able to achieve a comfortable and fogless setup. Be careful, too far down your nose changes the Rx and may lead to complications.
Depends on the type of contact lens you’re wearing. If you’re wearing a hard Ortho-K specialty lens, then this lens is actually designed to be worn when you sleep. Additionally, if you specifically have an extended wear lens, then these lenses can also be worn while you sleep. However, in most cases contacts CANNOT be worn while you sleep, this is because it can cause various contact lens associated conditions. For instance, it can cause your eyes to dry out, as well as cause new blood vessels to start growing on your eyes because your eyes are deprived of oxygen, resulting in irritation, discomfort and blurry vision. Be sure to talk to your eye doctor about proper contact lens hygiene.
Daily wear lenses are contacts that you wear only throughout the day. You must remove your ‘daily wear’ contacts before going to sleep. Daily wear lenses are not necessarily the same thing as daily disposable contact lenses; there are certain daily wear lenses that can be worn for more than a single day’s wear before disposal. ‘Daily wear’ lenses can be replaced daily, weekly, or monthly depending on the brand of the contact lens. Essentially ‘daily wear’ refers to the wearing schedule of the lens.
Daily disposable contact lenses are single-use contacts that are discarded after one day’s use. With this design you open up a fresh new pack every day. They are becoming more popular because they are considered one of the healthiest contact lens options for your eyes. Since dailies are less prone to lens deposits accumulating and less of a chance to develop contact lens related eye infections. There are also other advantages to dailies such as them being more convenient because there is no lens cleaning required and they do not need to be stored in a solution or case. Daily disposable contacts are also sometimes found to feel more comfortable due to the thinner nature of the lens.
Yes. Daily disposable contact lenses are single-use contacts that are discarded after one day’s use. With this design you open up a fresh new pack every day. Daily disposable contacts are more convenient because there is no lens cleaning required and they do not need to be stored in a solution or case. Daily disposable contact lenses are also healthier on the eyes since they are less prone to lens deposits accumulating and less of a chance to develop contact lens related eye infections. Daily disposable contacts are also sometimes found to feel more comfortable due to the thinner nature of the lens.
Are daily contact lenses (dailies) better for eye allergy sufferers than monthlies? Answer: First it’s important to treat your eye allergies, but yes daily contact lenses are better than monthly contact lenses for patients who suffer with eye allergies. Dailies are single use contact lenses so you place a fresh new set of lenses into your eyes everyday. However with monthlies the same lens is used for 30 days so there is more protein and lipid deposits accumulating on the lens, and then when you place this lens on your eye it can cause irritation and discomfort. Dailies usually are also made of a thinner material so they feel more comfortable on your eyes than monthlies. Be sure to have a contact lens evaluation with your eye doctor to determine which lens is best for you.
Daily disposable contact lenses are single-use contacts that are discarded after one day’s use. With this design you open up a fresh new pack every day. There are several advantages of daily disposable contact lenses. For example,daily disposable contacts are more convenient because there is no lens cleaning required and they do not need to be stored in a solution or case. Daily disposable contact lenses are also healthier on the eyes since they are less prone to lens deposits accumulating and less of a chance to develop contact lens related eye infections. Daily disposable contacts are also sometimes found to feel more comfortable due to the thinner nature of the lens.
These are daily disposable contact lenses. Daily disposable contact lenses are single-use contacts that are discarded after one day’s use. With this design you open up a fresh new pack every day. There are several advantages of daily disposable contact lenses. For example, daily disposable contacts are more convenient because there is no lens cleaning required and they do not need to be stored in a solution or case. So although daily disposables may appear to be more expensive, you are actually saving money on not needing any contact lens solutions/cleaning agents or cases. Also, daily disposable contact lenses are healthier on the eyes since they are less prone to lens deposits accumulating and less of a chance to develop contact lens related eye infections. Daily disposable contacts are also sometimes found to feel more comfortable due to the thinner nature of the lens. Additionally, depending on the brand of contact lenses, they vary in prices and can be less expensive than some biweekly or monthly lenses. So, be sure to have a proper contact lens evaluation with your eye doctor so they can discuss which option is best for you.
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Summary

You may encounter some issues while using contact lenses. It’s therefore important to learn more about them, so that when problems arise, you know how to deal with them. If you have any questions regarding issues with your contact lenses, don’t hesitate to contact us at (360) 491-2121.

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